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Jen Fifield

Reporter

Jen Fifield previously covered Maricopa County and Phoenix for The Arizona Republic, including the high-profile review of the county’s 2020 election. Prior to that, she covered politics and government for local newspapers in Maryland and state policy for Stateline, a news service run by The Pew Charitable Trusts. She has won several regional press awards in Arizona and Maryland for her investigative, feature, politics and education reporting. Jen is a Phoenix native and graduated from Arizona State University’s Cronkite School.

In Maricopa County, residents lash out at supervisors and dismiss explanations of Election Day problems. In Cochise, supervisors postpone certification again.
Two counties have postponed until the last minute, but election lawyers say the courts will force the certification by the deadline no matter what.
The Republican supervisors are asking a judge to compel the elections director to expand the hand count audit of ballots in the midterm election.
Maricopa County is researching these provisional ballots from voters who left an original location and tried to vote elsewhere.
The fullest explanation the county has made so far about what went wrong.
When the machine wouldn’t take the ballot, voters were told to place their ballots into a slot on a secure box, which the county has labeled “door 3.”
Republicans sued to keep vote centers open late, but a judge said there was no evidence voters were disenfranchised.
Ruling caps month-long spectacle marked by confusing proposals from Republican officials, warnings from the state, and arguments from lawyers who defended Cyber Ninjas.
Advocates want Apache County to create vote centers where anyone can cast a ballot instead of using precinct-based voting.
Clean Elections USA is trying to mobilize thousands of volunteers to collect evidence for True the Vote and a conservative sheriffs’ group, internal communications show.
Facing state’s threat of lawsuit, county supervisors voted instead to expand its hand-count audit as allowed under Arizona law.
Counties are mailing out correct ballots and are contacting affected voters to help them cast the right one, even if they already sent a vote in.
Cochise County board’s two Republicans seek emergency vote, against attorney’s advice, on manual vote tally for November election.
Cochise County officials consider plan for manually tallying votes in November — a method that produces inaccurate results and takes much longer, research shows.
Volunteers for “Operation Eagles Wings” are using surveys in eight states to seek support for conspiracy theories.
Counties are taking new measures to prevent observers and poll workers from disrupting voting.
Nine in ten Arizona voters take advantage of the state’s no-excuse early voting and vote-by-mail system, now under threat by the same party that created it.
Yavapai County voted overwhelmingly for Trump, and most voters there used ballot drop boxes. “2000 Mules” is energizing the movement to ban them.
Arizona election officials prep for surge in in-person voting during August primary. The state has had mail voting for decades.
Covering the “audit” of the 2020 election was the most important work of my career. I want to keep informing voters.
Bill passed with bipartisan support may lead to burdensome number of recounts, add to election costs, and delay final results, experts warn.
The Electronic Registration Information Center is trusted by most states as the most effective way to perform cross-state voter registration checks.