Democrats have enough time to decide on a new nominee without a risk to ballot deadlines for the November election.

They’ve been confronting the threat of politically motivated violence for years. Now, they must go further to protect and reassure voters.

As systems come back online, officials must figure out how to protect against a catastrophic breakdown in November.

For now, residents who don’t provide documentation will have to use a federal form, or risk having their registration rejected. County recorders could face charges.

The directive seeks to cut down on ballot rejections and resolve inconsistencies in county policies.

Hand-counting ballots

Election officials warn against the inaccurate and costly practice of tallying votes manually instead of using machines.

The state says voters are allowed to return only their own ballots, but there are nuances that observers could seize on to raise suspicion.

At some point, ballots have to go to the printer with the candidate’s name on them.

Reporting for Wisconsin voters means remembering that the stability of our democracy isn’t guaranteed.

But some clerks and legal experts aren’t convinced that the attorney general’s guidance will withstand challenges.

The judge’s decision in an ongoing lawsuit puts the Wisconsin Elections Commission on a tight timeline to implement the technology.

An impending Supreme Court ruling may help define the limits of the First Amendment, and the government’s power to police online falsehoods.

The confirmation vote came one month after a staff member sent the mayor a letter saying Paulina Gutiérrez is unfamiliar with the processes needed to run elections smoothly.

Defamation suit prompts distributor to disavow film about illegal voting. But its creators haven’t stopped selling the movie, or its false premise.

Some people with a criminal history aren’t clear on whether — and when — they regain their rights.

Bryan Blehm has not shown remorse, state bar attorneys told a Supreme Court disciplinary judge in recommending stiff punishment.

The action comes after Votebeat and The Texas Tribune confirmed that some voters’ choices can later be identified through legally available records.

The plaintiff is requesting a judge to require voters to return a signed copy of their absentee request with their ballot for it to count.

The laws have created a minefield for administrators — and the groups that have traditionally helped them.

Election officials are running tests and soliciting advice on handling the extra paper.

Counties split on whether to accept ballots from voters who didn’t fill the date in completely. That could mean more litigation.

‘What we're seeing right now is that conflict between transparency and secrecy.’

After a setback at the federal level, voting rights groups are basing their case this time on a clause in the state constitution that affirms a right to vote.

The public has wide access to a trove of records that, in some cases, can be used to figure out exactly how someone voted. Election administrators want that fixed.