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Natalia Contreras

Reporter, Votebeat Texas

Natalia Contreras has covered a range of topics as a community journalist including local government, public safety, immigration, and social issues. Natalia comes to Votebeat from the Austin American-Statesman, where her reporting focused on impacts of government policies on communities of color. Natalia previously reported for the Indianapolis Star, where she helped launch the first Spanish-language newsletter, and at the Corpus Christi Caller-Times. Natalia was born in Tampico, Tamaulipas, Mexico, and grew up in Corpus Christi, Texas.

After last-minute challenge from attorney general, county commissioners agree to certify those provisional votes in time for canvassing deadline.
The state’s biggest county has no central system for tracking problems, so it still can’t say how many polling places opened late, ran out of paper, or worked just fine.
In the face of their suspicions and threats, Heider Garcia didn’t fight back. He welcomed them in and listened.
Asian voters were most disproportionately affected by ID requirement under new voting law, according to analysis by the Brennan Center.
Case brought by allies of Laura Pressley sparked years-long conflict with Gillespie County election staff.
Defamation case proceeds in Texas despite arrest of Konnech CEO in Los Angeles investigation.
“Can we go back to focusing on the testing, please?” official pleads as crowd demands answers to conspiracy theories.
Case cites election-integrity group’s own public claims that it stole data from Michigan company that makes software for managing poll workers.
Aggrieved anti-fluoride activists, low pay, and understaffing eventually drove away Gillespie County’s election officials.
Texas attorney general’s office sent multiple memos this summer instructing election officials to follow longtime precedent. Then he changed his mind.
After “seeking God’s guidance,” the group has engaged in year-long campaign of chasing evidence, lobbying government, and harassing an election official, with little to show for it.
The 300,000 March ballots are public records under state law, but the effort in Tarrant County may just be a warmup for endlessly disputed elections.
As an immigrant, I find our election system intimidating and confusing. That’s what makes my reporting so valuable to the communities that need it.