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Watch: Lessons learned from the 2022 midterms, according to election administrators

Election officials from across the country discuss how to prepare for 2024.

Natalie Adona, assistant clerk–recorder/registrar of voters and clerk-recorder elect for Nevada County, Calif. (Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag)

At the Bipartisan Policy Center’s annual Election Summit, Votebeat Story Editor Carrie Levine moderated a panel of election officials recapping election administration from the 2022 midterms. They discussed the triumphs and lessons learned that can be applied to elections in 2023 and 2024.

Levine moderated a panel of experts and election officials featuring:

  • Natalie Adona, assistant clerk–recorder/registrar of voters and clerk-recorder elect for Nevada County, Calif.
  • Seth Bluestein, Philadelphia city commissioner
  • Ben Hovland, commissioner,  U.S. Election Assistance Commission
  • Maggie Toulouse Oliver, New Mexico secretary of state

You can watch the panel discussion below. The rest of the panels were also live streamed throughout the day. Check out the full schedule here.

If the video player is not loading on this page, you can watch the discussion on YouTube.

The Bipartisan Policy Center’s Election Summit brings together elected leaders, experts, election officials, and journalists to help solve problems in voting and election administration in America.

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