Jen Fifield

Jen Fifield

Reporter

Jen Fifield previously covered Maricopa County and Phoenix for The Arizona Republic, including the high-profile review of the county’s 2020 election. Prior to that, she covered politics and government for local newspapers in Maryland and state policy for Stateline, a news service run by The Pew Charitable Trusts. She has won several regional press awards in Arizona and Maryland for her investigative, feature, politics and education reporting. Jen is a Phoenix native and graduated from Arizona State University’s Cronkite School.

Early voting is about to begin for the state’s March 19 presidential preference election, but only Democrats and Republicans can participate.

The southern Arizona county is torn on next steps after shutting down a state grant to test secure ballots.

How Arizona’s divided legislature united behind a solution that sets the primary for July 30 this year and changes how mail-in ballots are verified.

In wide-ranging lawsuit over the new Elections Procedures Manual, Republican lawmakers allege the secretary of state can’t make rules for counties on certifying their elections.

In an email citing voting machine misinformation, Jim O’Connor pressured Maricopa County supervisors to delay certification “until all the facts come to light.”

A commotion over the midterm election in the rural Arizona county attracted national attention. Now, there are efforts to connect and rebuild.

The state’s voting rules and new laws have created an unforgiving timeline for the 2024 presidential election. But there’s many ways to compress the schedule to make it work.

Arizona’s governor and secretary of state say it’s fine not to consistently monitor ballot drop boxes. But Republicans say the law doesn’t bear that out, and the Elections Procedures Manual finalized in December doesn’t clarify.

The state requires proof of citizenship to register to vote. Young college students are disproportionately affected, and potentially disenfranchised, by these laws, a Votebeat analysis found.

Officials encounter new obstacles and costs in trying to replace just some of the data they used to get from the Electronic Registration Information Center, unreleased records show.